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Tuesday, August 13, 2013

One Day...A Charismatic Leader Of Underworld Will Be Prime Minister Of Malaysia!!!



In the future...one fine day...a charismatic leader of underworld will be a Prime Minister of Malaysia!

The underworld can collaborate with the oppositions...

The underworld can buy top government officials and politicians...

The underworld can buy kings...

The underworld can buy EVERYTHING...

Through Japanese experience...

The Yakuza have maintained a very close relationship with Japanese political and corporate entities in their growth through the years, much more so than their counterpart, the mafia, in the United States.

Due to the political turmoil that followed in the aftermath of World War II, the Yakuza, in their extremely right-wing conservative stance, were granted the opportunity to obtain a foothold in the political machinery of modern Japanese governing bodies in their struggle against right-wing dissidents. 

However, this formerly accorded position has degraded in the years following the war as left-wing political entities have lost their influence in the Japanese political system.

Since the aftermath of the Second World War, violence among different Yakuza factions has increased, and the organizations have degraded from their original stature. A prominent rise has been seen in the boryokudan, or violence gangs, and in the bosozoku, the Japanese biker gangs.

These minor factions have introduced a considerable degree of discord into the traditional criminal underworld system, and there is a "clear trend of declining solidarity and obedience among Yakuza members." 

Older members are dismayed with the decline of moral values and increasing gun use among the up and coming generation of yakuza, which has never been a major problem in Japan. 

This transformation in conduct among members in the criminal underworld is seen as a major problem not only by the older generation of criminals, but by law enforcement agencies as well.

Recent crackdowns have done well to alleviate the outward symptoms, but as many criminals are subsequently released without prosecution, they in fact have had little impact on the underlying problem. 

The future of the Yakuza remains uncertain – but Japan is and always has been a country of considerable outward changes – capable of remarkable adaptation to fit with changing times, while maintaining unity at its heart. 

The Yakuza, as part of this system, will continue to evolve with the changing times, but it is highly unlikely that an organization that traces its roots back over 300 years will disappear any time soon.

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